Remembering Munna

In the second part of the Remembering Tigers series, a tiger who has the word ‘CAT’ on his forehead and loves to walk in public.

Remembering B2

In this first of a series remembering tigers, presenting the only tiger I’ve ever seen who was a sage. B2.

Aloneness

A chat in a tent leads to a startling realisation about aloneness.

How does it feel to see a wild tiger?

So how does it feel to see a wild tiger? I could tell you that waiting for a tiger to emerge feels like watching raindrops trickle off a roofline while awaiting your beloved – a wistful longing fanned by sweet anticipation. But that wouldn’t let you know what it’s like to melt in your own…

The Apples of My Eyes: All the Bandhavgarh Tigers I’ve Seen

Since I discovered the immensely pleasurable activity of watching tigers in 2006, I’ve had the privilege of visiting 17 tiger reserves, and each of these has been special, but none towers over my consciousness as a certain park, in an overwhelming sort of way.   Bandhavgarh. That name occupies so much space in my heart, that…

Lines on Water

There was a veneer of grass on the forest canvas, and it was ruffled now by the hot wind, as though tousled by a dragon’s breath. The earth heaved as the sun drank from the lake, like a giant sucking honeydew off a dying man’s plate. A mirage had centre stage. I sat watching the…

Watcher on the Wall

  Between the banks of night and day, she stands gazing at the undual, still in the flow. Seasons come and phases lapse, but her vigil flies aloft. It reaches beyond man, beast and plant, and touches the source of all.But she’s not a hoarder of beliefs, collector of memories or weaver of dreams. She’s…

Revelations in the Dark

I’m the water for which you thirst, the fire in which you burn, and the air that fans it. I’m the quiver of your lips, the throb in your belly, the blood in your cheeks and the stutter on your tongue.I’m your frown of frustration and squeal of delight.I’m the spring in your step, the…

Top Eight Antelopes of Kenya

  They’re colourful, come in a variety of sizes and show true diversity and imagination with their head gear.  Scan any piece of a Kenyan wilderness expanse, and chances are you’ll spot one of them in the frame. Mostly busy feeding, they dot the savannah with their northward horns and bony legs as sitting ducks…